Equipment Care

"

medical equipment.jpg

""When a person is hungry and you give him a fish, his hunger is satisfied for that occasion. If you teach him how to catch a fish, it can take care of his hunger for the rest of his life.” This is a teaching principle that is often repeated, and one that is also very useful in the maintenance of medical equipment.

The instruments and equipment used in modern eye care have become very sophisticated and expensive. Keeping them in good working condition can become a nightmare, especially if hospitals are located in places where there is little service support from manufacturers or suppliers. These items can fail to work unexpectedly and the resultant downtime can compromise outcomes and patient safety.

An important fact about instruments and equipment is that, when manufactured by well-established firms and supplied by reliable dealers, they seldom fail, provided they are maintained as described in the user manual."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1871690/

Gut Feeling!

bacteria.jpg

"The circadian clock is, in fact, a "collection" of biological clocks in the body, playing an important role in metabolism. These clocks regulate the individual's various biological rhythms in accordance with the 24-hour day-night cycle.

The researchers, led by Dr. Lora Hooper of UT Southwestern, noticed that the gut microbiome is able to "hack" into and influence the intestinal circadian clock, thus impacting how much fat, or lipids, is absorbed by and stored in the body.

"There is accumulating evidence," explains lead study author Yuhao Wang, a UT Southwestern graduate student, "that certain bacteria that live in our gut might predispose us to gain weight, especially when we consume a high-fat, high-sugar 'Western-style' diet.""

 

To continue reading, please click the link below!

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319390.php

BMET Programs

download (6).jpg

"As it prepares to launch a new program in Nigeria, Engineering World Health today announced the results of two peer-reviewed evaluations demonstrating the profound impact their Biomedical Engineering Technician (BMET) program has had on the repair of critical medical equipment and technician productivity in the developing world.

"We are thrilled that our BMET program is having a very real impact on access to critical medical equipment in the developing world," said Leslie Calman, PhD, CEO of Engineering World Health. "The results of these two studies indicate that our mission of building sustainable workforces of trained BMETs in-country will increase access to life-saving medical care and higher standards of care for years to come."

Focus on global health often centers on a call for biomedical technology and tools. However, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Engineering, approximately 72% of hospital equipment in sub-Saharan Africa cannot be used for patient care because it is in disrepair, delaying surgical procedures and other critical treatment."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

http://www.ewh.org/news/blog/527-studies-find-bmet-programs-dramatically-increase-use-of-life-saving-medical-equipment-in-africa-central-america-asia

Job Skills - Medical Equpiment

"What’s Needed:

service medical equipment.jpg
  • An associate’s degree in biomedical equipment technology engineering or electronics is a requirement for most medical equipment repairers.
  • Attending schools for training in more complex equipment is often necessary but employers may supply this particularly equipment manufacturers.
  • Ongoing education is vital for these specialists as biomedical equipment becomes more sophisticated.
  • For some technicians military service provides an education in biomedical equipment technology.

What you study:

Whether through a university on-the-job learning or military training the course of study for biomedical equipment specialists typically includes:

  • Mechanical engineering
  • Electrical engineering
  • Electronics
  • Computer-aided design
  • Human anatomy and physiology"

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://www.myperfectresume.com/how-to/career-resources/medical-equipment-repair-technicians/

Your CPAP Didn't Work?

"Your piercing, chainsaw snore may be a favorite family joke — but it should also be a figurative wake-up call.

CPAP.png

Habitual, loud snoring is a key symptom of sleep apnea, a disease that affects 12-18 million Americans and increases the risk of health problems including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, erectile dysfunction and depression.

You’ve likely heard of the “gold standard” for sleep apnea treatment, a machine with a running motor, tubing and a face mask called a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine. However, for many sleep apnea sufferers, relief lies far from the mask in an effective alternative treatment called oral appliance therapy.

Oral appliance therapy uses a “mouth-guard” like device worn only during sleep to hold your jaw forward and open your airway. Pioneered by dentists, oral appliance therapy began its surge into sleep apnea treatment plans in the early 1990s. Now, more than 20 years later, a growing mass of research is proving that oral appliances are an effective alternative to CPAP in treating many people with sleep apnea, and that patients are more likely to use oral appliances, even seven days a week, to get a good night’s rest.

What does oral appliance therapy offer the sleepless snorer?"

To continue reading, please click on the link listed below!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/b-gail-demko-dmd/unmasking-sleep-apnea-tre_b_5282602.html

Is it a waste?

"As legislators debate about the future of the Affordable Care Act and citizens look to lawmakers to reduce health care costs, there is a perhaps surprising source of why these costs can be so high: "medical surplus," or usable supplies that hospitals throw out.

Medical supplies that are in perfect, usable condition are often put out in the trash by health care facilities, ProPublica reported. And it adds up to an estimated $765 billion a year, according to a 2012 report by the National Academy of Medicine.

Elizabeth McLellan, a registered nurse, took advantage of this waste 10 years ago and now ships unused equipment overseas to developing nations in collaboration with hundreds of volunteers collecting medical equipment for her nonprofit organization, Partners for World Health, which has four warehouses in Maine and is built mostly on monetary and supply donations."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://www.usnews.com/news/healthcare-of-tomorrow/articles/2017-03-09/hospitals-are-wasting-billions-of-dollars-worth-of-medical-equipment

Safety Modifications

"Elderly loved ones may be frail, weak from a recent illness, or suffer from a debilitating disease that causes impaired balance or vision. Therefore, their odds of having an accident at home, particularly in the bathroom, are greatly increased. Employ some tactical measures and install strategic safety equipment to reduce fall risks and create a safe zone for your loved ones. For those who have difficulty walking or balancing, they are likely to run into trouble using a standard height toilet or getting in and out of a customary shower / bathtub. Fear of falling and injury can cause justifiable anxiety for your loved ones. Adapt some of the following safety modifications to enhance your parent's independence, sense of security, and overall comfort. Your thoughtful efforts can result in preventing a serious accident that could be devastating to your folk's welfare."

 

Dialysis on the go?

"People with chronic kidney failure face a bleak future. Conventional dialysis cleanses the blood of only about 17% of the toxic chemicals that a healthy kidney removes. And donor organs are scarce. The 300,000 Americans who depend on dialysis to stay alive are crippled by an array of complications caused by the buildup of dangerous poisons in their blood, and only one-third survive more than five years.

Experimental devices in development could help turn this situation around. One advance, a battery-powered, wearable dialysis machine, would allow users to have their blood cleansed round the clock instead of being hooked up to machines 12 hours a week, potentially improving quality of life and reducing mortality. Even further ahead, blood-filtering systems created via nanotechnology -- engineering on a scale one-billionth the size of a meter -- may prove more effective than current dialysis and may even lead to miniaturized, implantable artificial organs that mimic the continuous function of healthy kidneys.

"There's been an explosion in innovation in dialysis in the past few years," says Dr. Allen Nissenson, director of the Dialysis Program at UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine. "In the not too far future, this new technology could transform the field. . . . If it works, it could improve people's lives by providing a form of dialysis that is much more like what natural kidneys do.""

For more information, please click on the link listed below!

http://articles.latimes.com/2007/nov/12/health/he-lab12

Drone Possibilities?

"When it comes to getting emergency health services to cardiac patients, the fastest route may be as the drone flies. Recent studies in Canada and Sweden have shown some promising data with simulations of delivering care from the sky. 

A Canadian study examined historical data on 53,702 cardiac arrests over 10,367 square miles of rural and urban regions surrounding Toronto to see if drones armed with defibrillators could be deployed to those patients faster than an ambulance. 

In simulations, drones in urban areas yielded the greatest time savings of 6 minutes 43 seconds, and in rural areas the best times clocked got the drone to the patient 10 minutes and 43 seconds sooner than average 911 response times.

"Paramedics can take over after they arrive, but because survival from cardiac arrest is so time-sensitive, even defibrillating the patient a minute before paramedics get there can make a huge difference," Timothy Chan, director of the Center for Healthcare Engineering at the University of Toronto, told Reuters.

Researchers reached similar conclusions after analyzing cardiac arrest data in Sweden, focusing on towns near Stockholm that don't have enough emergency medical resources to serve summer vacationers. The analysis found an emergency response time of almost 30 minutes and a survival rate of zero under current conditions, said Andreas Claesson, a researcher at the Center for Resuscitation Science at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm and lead author of a study published in JAMA. The simulation showed drones arrived within five minutes of launch. "

To continue reading, please click on the link below! 

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20170623/NEWS/170629966/drones-could-speed-up-defibrillator-delivery

Wheelchair Wedding!

"Out on the edge of the Pacific, on a patio stretching below the swank Ritz-Carlton hotel, the groom smiled nervously. His bride looked radiant, hair encircled with flowers, wedding dress trailing behind as she stepped slowly down the aisle, father at her side.

In most ways, the Saturday fete was like any other wedding. Except one.

The bride is paralyzed from the chest down. But she was able to stride delicately across the bricks because of the ingenuity of the man she was marrying.

This is no ordinary couple, no facsimile of the pair atop the wedding cake.

Janni Smith has not had the use of her legs since 1980, when she was gunned down by a paid assassin seven months after she walked out on her ex-boyfriend. Jerrold Petrofsky is the Irvine-based medical researcher she sought out for help, the man conducting pioneering tests to allow the disabled to walk again."

For more information, please click on the link below! 

http://articles.latimes.com/1991-12-01/local/me-1005_1_research-project

Cleaning Processes May Vary

"A recent outbreak in California of drug-resistant bacteria tied to contaminated endoscopy instruments is helping to bring to light similar outbreaks in other states, according to a report in Bloomberg Business. The bacteria involved are called called Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE).

For instance, six years ago, 15 patients died and another 70 were sickened in Florida in an outbreak similar to the one that occurred at the UCLA Medical Center in recent months. Other “superbug” cases occurred in Pennsylvania, Illinois, and Wisconsin in the past few years—each of which was tied to exposure to a certain type of endoscope and which was not made public, according Bloomberg.

“States have a haphazard approach to tracking the infections,” the news organization reported. “Only about half of the 44 state health departments that responded to questions from Bloomberg said they require hospitals and labs to report individual cases of CRE.”"

For more information, please click the link below!

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/42326/title/Tough-to-Clean-Equipment-a-Bigger-Problem/

Durable Equipment?

"A health policy specialist recently spoke to a community audience about the difficult ethical problems facing family members when serious illness strikes a close relative. After the talk a woman in the audience approached the speaker and said, "That was very interesting. May I ask a question?" "Of course," the speaker replied, "What is it?" The woman said, "Where can I get extra large adult diapers for my mother?"

This incident illustrates two points. First, the basic needs of elderly or ill people must be addressed before they or their family members can think about more abstract or long-term issues. Second, it is very difficult to obtain information about meeting these basic needs, especially when it comes to finding the right products or supplies. The policies and practices of third-party payers - whether private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid - are often confusing and inconsistent. Nevertheless, with a little persistence and some basic information, you can become a more knowledgeable and satisfied consumer. The reward will be an improved quality of life for both the elderly person and the caregiver.

There are two main types of products: durable medical equipment and disposable medical supplies. Both types are used at home to make it easier to manage the basic needs and medical care of elderly, ill or disabled persons. However, both broad categories cover a wide range of products in terms of cost, availability, and effectiveness."

For more information, please click on the link listed below!

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/guide-to-durable-medical-equipment-and-medical-supplies-104574.htm

Hospital Beds

"Hospital beds in the home serve two major purposes:

  • They permit body positioning that is not feasible in a regular home bed.
  • They permit the attachment of other pieces of equipment that cannot be used on a regular home bed.

Of course, hospital beds may provide several other advantages such as: making it easier and safer for the patient to get in and out of the bed; and to reach a standing position for ambulation with crutches, walker or cane making transfers to and from wheelchairs or bed side commode's easier and safer, and making care giving much easier by placing the bed at a more convenient height for providing assistance with position changes, turning, bathing, eating and performing other bedside care."

To continue reading this article, please click on the link below!

http://www.medsuppliersnetwork.com/equipment-guide/hospital-beds

Wedding of a Lifetime

"Out on the edge of the Pacific, on a patio stretching below the swank Ritz-Carlton hotel, the groom smiled nervously. His bride looked radiant, hair encircled with flowers, wedding dress trailing behind as she stepped slowly down the aisle, father at her side.

In most ways, the Saturday fete was like any other wedding. Except one.

The bride is paralyzed from the chest down. But she was able to stride delicately across the bricks because of the ingenuity of the man she was marrying.

This is no ordinary couple, no facsimile of the pair atop the wedding cake.

Janni Smith has not had the use of her legs since 1980, when she was gunned down by a paid assassin seven months after she walked out on her ex-boyfriend. Jerrold Petrofsky is the Irvine-based medical researcher she sought out for help, the man conducting pioneering tests to allow the disabled to walk again.

Smith first became a volunteer in the research project. Later, she and Petrofsky became business partners. And finally, they became husband and wife."

To continue reading this article, please click on the link listed below! 

http://articles.latimes.com/1991-12-01/local/me-1005_1_research-project

Behold.. The Future!

"Forget those old, bulky electrodes of the past. Researchers have created a device that can track your heart, brain and muscle activity as effectively as conventional monitoring systems -- and is thin enough to be laminated onto the skin like a temporary tattoo. Down the line, such electronic patches could be used to monitor vital functions, aid in physical rehabilitation or perhaps be deployed in covert military operations.

John Rogers, a materials scientist with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, discussed the research and its potential future uses.

--

How did you make such a thin, flexible, stretchable electronic device?"

 

To continue reading this article, please click on the link below! 

http://articles.latimes.com/2011/aug/27/science/la-sci-electronic-tattoo-20110827

Safe Use of Medical Equipment

"A medical device is, simply defined, any item used to diagnose, treat, or prevent disease, injury, or any other condition that is not a drug, biologic, or food. The official United States (U.S.) definition of the term ‘device’ can be found in the Federal Food Drug & Cosmetic Act (1998) enforced by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Medical devices range from items as simple as tongue depressors to more complex devices, such as ventilators. They represent some of the most innovative technologies developed in recent years. Yet regardless of how novel a device may be, the public expects, and the Food and Drug Administration requires that medical devices be safe, effective, and manufactured in accordance with current manufacturing practices."

To continue reading this article, please click on the link listed below! 

http://nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol-17-2012/No1-Jan-2012/Articles-Previous-Topics/Safe-Use-of-Devices.html

When Health Equipment Turns Deadly!

"More than 1,000 hypodermic needles washed ashore at Huntington Beach on Thursday afternoon, forcing the closure of more than two miles of shoreline, authorities said.

The first needles were discovered by a city lifeguard at about 3:30 p.m. Soon the devices were surfacing hundreds at a time, prompting Orange County health officials to declare the beach off-limits and order it roped off with yellow police tape."

For more information, please follow the link listed below! 

http://articles.latimes.com/1999/sep/17/local/me-11310

Pressure Relief Surfaces

"The specialised TPU film is highly conformable and minimises deformation of underlying tissue.

The risk of hypoxia and tissue damage is greatly reduced.

TPU is moisture vapour permeable reducing the risk of maceration.

TPU stretches up to 6 times in every direction for optimum patient support and comfort.

TPU provides a soft and smooth user interface minimising friction and shear forces."

To find more information on Pressure Relief Surfaces, please follow the link listed below!

http://www.reposedirect.com/healthcare-professionals/pressure-relief-surfaces/

Healthy Living!

"Many factors affect your health. Some you cannot control, such as your genetic makeup or your age. But you can make changes to your lifestyle. By taking steps toward healthy living, you can help reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke and other serious diseases:

  • Get the screening tests you need
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Eat a variety of healthy foods, and limit calories and saturated fat
  • Be physically active
  • Control your blood pressure and cholesterol
  • Don't smoke
  • Protect yourself from too much sun
  • Drink alcohol in moderation, or don't drink at all
  • Get enough sleep every day"

Please follow the link below for further information on living a healthy lifestyle. 

https://medlineplus.gov/healthyliving.html

Assisted Living

"Assisted living facilities offer a housing alternative for older adults who may need help with dressing, bathing, eating, and toileting, but do not require the intensive medical and nursing care provided in nursing homes."

http://www.eldercare.gov/ELDERCARE.NET/Public/Resources/Factsheets/Assisted_Living.aspx"