Making the Switch!

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"For many SCI survivors, recapturing independence is your single most significant achievement. You view any concessions to that independence - accepting more help, using more or different equipment - as giving up, as failure, as the ultimate defeat. But it's hard to deny the fatigue and pain that may come from years of pushing a manual chair. Switching to a power chair actually could be the way to maintain that independence.

Symptoms & Signs:

Accepting change is rarely easy. Many survivors choose to ignore the signals which indicate that a power chair would be appropriate for them. Picturing themselves in a power chair or admitting they might need one can be one of the most difficult adjustments for those with SCI. Physical therapists say there are three major issues that result in symptoms which cause people to make equipment changes: level of injury, number of years post injury and age. These three factors often interact, and they result in:

  • lower strength or function
  • increased pain
  • decreased mobility
  • weight gain or loss
  • less activity
  • skin sores
  • posture problems
  • fatigue
  • aging of the primary care givers"

To continue reading, please click the link below!

https://www.pridemobility.com/resources-and-support/power-chair-articles/switching-to-a-power-chair

Best Selling Hot/Cold Therapy Units!

"When it comes to injuries and pain relief, there really is no better aid than heating and cooling agents. Both have their place and can rapidly influence things like inflammation, swelling, sensory nerve response and so forth.

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But what heating and cooling agents are best to recommend to patients?

There are a number of options, each of them are designed for specific applications. So I've compiled a list of the best selling heating and cooling packs and therapy units, along with some of the benefits of each and the types of situations they are best suited to.

As a registered physiotherapist and clinic owner in Toronto, I treat a variety of patients (sports, wcb, mva, private) and believe in offering complete care at my own practice. Offering “complete care” includes recommending helpful advice and products that can boost your patient’s recovery.

Today I want to share my opinion on what I like/don’t like about CSC's top 10 best selling hot packs and cold therapy units, as well as which type of patients are most suited for these products so we can better help clinicians offer complete care for your practice."

 

To continue reading, please click on the link below! 

http://blog.clinicsuppliescanada.com/2015-best-selling-hot-packs-and-cold-therapy-units

The Guide!

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"A health policy specialist recently spoke to a community audience about the difficult ethical problems facing family members when serious illness strikes a close relative. After the talk a woman in the audience approached the speaker and said, "That was very interesting. May I ask a question?" "Of course," the speaker replied, "What is it?" The woman said, "Where can I get extra large adult diapers for my mother?"

This incident illustrates two points. First, the basic needs of elderly or ill people must be addressed before they or their family members can think about more abstract or long-term issues. Second, it is very difficult to obtain information about meeting these basic needs, especially when it comes to finding the right products or supplies. The policies and practices of third-party payers - whether private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid - are often confusing and inconsistent. Nevertheless, with a little persistence and some basic information, you can become a more knowledgeable and satisfied consumer. The reward will be an improved quality of life for both the elderly person and the caregiver."

To continue reading, please click the link below!

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/guide-to-durable-medical-equipment-and-medical-supplies-104574.htm

Blood Cleansing

"The technique: A microfluidic device filled with magnetic nanometer-sized beads that bind a plethora of pathogens and toxins was able to clear these invaders from the blood of rats with sepsis, improving their outcomes, according to a paper published today (September 14) in Nature Medicine. The design of the extracorporeal device was inspired by the small vessels and sinusoids within the spleen, through which blood “trickles slowly, almost like in a wetlands, efficiently capturing pathogens” said lead study author Donald Ingber, a professor at Harvard Medical School and founding director of the Wyss Institute in Boston.

The device has two interconnected channels, one for the flowing blood and another containing a saline solution that traps and removes the pathogens. Magnetic nanobeads coated with a genetically engineered version of the mannose binding lectin (MBL) protein—which has a natural proclivity for foreign toxins and bugs, and normally functions as part of the mammalian innate immune system—are injected into the flowing blood before it enters the device."

To continue reading, please click the link below!

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/40979/title/Next-Generation--Blood-Cleansing-Device/

Medical Advancements & Coffee?

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"When a team of Vanderbilt University engineers sought a way to improve the reliability of positioning systems used in delicate nose and throat surgeries, coffee was the solution. Coffee grounds, that is.

The engineers designed a "granular jamming cap" filled with coffee grounds. The grounds form a thin layer inside a stretchy silicone cap adorned with reflective dots. Once on the patient's head, the cap is attached to a vacuum pump that sucks the air out, causing the grounds to conform closely to the contours of the patient's scalp.

Before the surgery begins, a scanner maps the precise location of each reflective dot relative to key features on the patient's head. During surgery, an overhead camera observes the position of the dots, allowing the navigation system to accurately track the position of the patient's head as the surgeon moves it. A monitor in the operating room displays the data in combination with a CT scan and the position of the surgeon's instruments for a 3-D view inside the patient's head.

This technology could replace one using markers that are taped to the head. That method is subject to slipping and jarring—movements that can cause large tracking errors during surgery. The coffee grounds approach has been found to reduce targeting errors by 83%."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20170706/NEWS/170709974/breaking-new-ground-on-surgical-positioning-systems-with-coffee

In Flight!

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"You're seated in an aircraft, flying at 30,000 feet across the country to attend an EMS conference. Unexpectedly, you hear a chime, and the flight attendant makes the announcement made popular by episodes of "Rescue 911" and other medical drama shows: "Is there a medical professional on board this aircraft?" Will you volunteer your knowledge and skills on this flight? Do you know what supplies and resources are available to you?

Every year, more than 500 million Americans travel by air in the U.S. (1) Medical emergencies aboard aircrafts are inevitable, and an estimated one per 10–40,000 passengers will experience one. (2) With commercial air traffic increasing, these emergencies are expected to become more frequent as the percentage of older people increases. (3) Although flight attendants are required to undergo initial and recurrent training on aviation medicine, first aid, CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED) usage every 12–24 months, EMTs, paramedics and other medical professionals can still provide valuable assessment and treatment to passengers who become ill in flight. (4,5) EMS providers should be aware of the legal protections afforded to them as Good Samaritans of the sky, along with equipment and technologies aboard aircrafts that will assist in providing patient care."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

http://www.jems.com/articles/2010/06/handling-flight-medical-emerge.html

Equipment Care

"

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""When a person is hungry and you give him a fish, his hunger is satisfied for that occasion. If you teach him how to catch a fish, it can take care of his hunger for the rest of his life.” This is a teaching principle that is often repeated, and one that is also very useful in the maintenance of medical equipment.

The instruments and equipment used in modern eye care have become very sophisticated and expensive. Keeping them in good working condition can become a nightmare, especially if hospitals are located in places where there is little service support from manufacturers or suppliers. These items can fail to work unexpectedly and the resultant downtime can compromise outcomes and patient safety.

An important fact about instruments and equipment is that, when manufactured by well-established firms and supplied by reliable dealers, they seldom fail, provided they are maintained as described in the user manual."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1871690/

Gut Feeling!

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"The circadian clock is, in fact, a "collection" of biological clocks in the body, playing an important role in metabolism. These clocks regulate the individual's various biological rhythms in accordance with the 24-hour day-night cycle.

The researchers, led by Dr. Lora Hooper of UT Southwestern, noticed that the gut microbiome is able to "hack" into and influence the intestinal circadian clock, thus impacting how much fat, or lipids, is absorbed by and stored in the body.

"There is accumulating evidence," explains lead study author Yuhao Wang, a UT Southwestern graduate student, "that certain bacteria that live in our gut might predispose us to gain weight, especially when we consume a high-fat, high-sugar 'Western-style' diet.""

 

To continue reading, please click the link below!

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319390.php

BMET Programs

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"As it prepares to launch a new program in Nigeria, Engineering World Health today announced the results of two peer-reviewed evaluations demonstrating the profound impact their Biomedical Engineering Technician (BMET) program has had on the repair of critical medical equipment and technician productivity in the developing world.

"We are thrilled that our BMET program is having a very real impact on access to critical medical equipment in the developing world," said Leslie Calman, PhD, CEO of Engineering World Health. "The results of these two studies indicate that our mission of building sustainable workforces of trained BMETs in-country will increase access to life-saving medical care and higher standards of care for years to come."

Focus on global health often centers on a call for biomedical technology and tools. However, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Engineering, approximately 72% of hospital equipment in sub-Saharan Africa cannot be used for patient care because it is in disrepair, delaying surgical procedures and other critical treatment."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

http://www.ewh.org/news/blog/527-studies-find-bmet-programs-dramatically-increase-use-of-life-saving-medical-equipment-in-africa-central-america-asia

Job Skills - Medical Equpiment

"What’s Needed:

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  • An associate’s degree in biomedical equipment technology engineering or electronics is a requirement for most medical equipment repairers.
  • Attending schools for training in more complex equipment is often necessary but employers may supply this particularly equipment manufacturers.
  • Ongoing education is vital for these specialists as biomedical equipment becomes more sophisticated.
  • For some technicians military service provides an education in biomedical equipment technology.

What you study:

Whether through a university on-the-job learning or military training the course of study for biomedical equipment specialists typically includes:

  • Mechanical engineering
  • Electrical engineering
  • Electronics
  • Computer-aided design
  • Human anatomy and physiology"

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://www.myperfectresume.com/how-to/career-resources/medical-equipment-repair-technicians/

Your CPAP Didn't Work?

"Your piercing, chainsaw snore may be a favorite family joke — but it should also be a figurative wake-up call.

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Habitual, loud snoring is a key symptom of sleep apnea, a disease that affects 12-18 million Americans and increases the risk of health problems including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, erectile dysfunction and depression.

You’ve likely heard of the “gold standard” for sleep apnea treatment, a machine with a running motor, tubing and a face mask called a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine. However, for many sleep apnea sufferers, relief lies far from the mask in an effective alternative treatment called oral appliance therapy.

Oral appliance therapy uses a “mouth-guard” like device worn only during sleep to hold your jaw forward and open your airway. Pioneered by dentists, oral appliance therapy began its surge into sleep apnea treatment plans in the early 1990s. Now, more than 20 years later, a growing mass of research is proving that oral appliances are an effective alternative to CPAP in treating many people with sleep apnea, and that patients are more likely to use oral appliances, even seven days a week, to get a good night’s rest.

What does oral appliance therapy offer the sleepless snorer?"

To continue reading, please click on the link listed below!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/b-gail-demko-dmd/unmasking-sleep-apnea-tre_b_5282602.html

Is it a waste?

"As legislators debate about the future of the Affordable Care Act and citizens look to lawmakers to reduce health care costs, there is a perhaps surprising source of why these costs can be so high: "medical surplus," or usable supplies that hospitals throw out.

Medical supplies that are in perfect, usable condition are often put out in the trash by health care facilities, ProPublica reported. And it adds up to an estimated $765 billion a year, according to a 2012 report by the National Academy of Medicine.

Elizabeth McLellan, a registered nurse, took advantage of this waste 10 years ago and now ships unused equipment overseas to developing nations in collaboration with hundreds of volunteers collecting medical equipment for her nonprofit organization, Partners for World Health, which has four warehouses in Maine and is built mostly on monetary and supply donations."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

https://www.usnews.com/news/healthcare-of-tomorrow/articles/2017-03-09/hospitals-are-wasting-billions-of-dollars-worth-of-medical-equipment

Safety Modifications

"Elderly loved ones may be frail, weak from a recent illness, or suffer from a debilitating disease that causes impaired balance or vision. Therefore, their odds of having an accident at home, particularly in the bathroom, are greatly increased. Employ some tactical measures and install strategic safety equipment to reduce fall risks and create a safe zone for your loved ones. For those who have difficulty walking or balancing, they are likely to run into trouble using a standard height toilet or getting in and out of a customary shower / bathtub. Fear of falling and injury can cause justifiable anxiety for your loved ones. Adapt some of the following safety modifications to enhance your parent's independence, sense of security, and overall comfort. Your thoughtful efforts can result in preventing a serious accident that could be devastating to your folk's welfare."

 

Dialysis on the go?

"People with chronic kidney failure face a bleak future. Conventional dialysis cleanses the blood of only about 17% of the toxic chemicals that a healthy kidney removes. And donor organs are scarce. The 300,000 Americans who depend on dialysis to stay alive are crippled by an array of complications caused by the buildup of dangerous poisons in their blood, and only one-third survive more than five years.

Experimental devices in development could help turn this situation around. One advance, a battery-powered, wearable dialysis machine, would allow users to have their blood cleansed round the clock instead of being hooked up to machines 12 hours a week, potentially improving quality of life and reducing mortality. Even further ahead, blood-filtering systems created via nanotechnology -- engineering on a scale one-billionth the size of a meter -- may prove more effective than current dialysis and may even lead to miniaturized, implantable artificial organs that mimic the continuous function of healthy kidneys.

"There's been an explosion in innovation in dialysis in the past few years," says Dr. Allen Nissenson, director of the Dialysis Program at UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine. "In the not too far future, this new technology could transform the field. . . . If it works, it could improve people's lives by providing a form of dialysis that is much more like what natural kidneys do.""

For more information, please click on the link listed below!

http://articles.latimes.com/2007/nov/12/health/he-lab12

Drone Possibilities?

"When it comes to getting emergency health services to cardiac patients, the fastest route may be as the drone flies. Recent studies in Canada and Sweden have shown some promising data with simulations of delivering care from the sky. 

A Canadian study examined historical data on 53,702 cardiac arrests over 10,367 square miles of rural and urban regions surrounding Toronto to see if drones armed with defibrillators could be deployed to those patients faster than an ambulance. 

In simulations, drones in urban areas yielded the greatest time savings of 6 minutes 43 seconds, and in rural areas the best times clocked got the drone to the patient 10 minutes and 43 seconds sooner than average 911 response times.

"Paramedics can take over after they arrive, but because survival from cardiac arrest is so time-sensitive, even defibrillating the patient a minute before paramedics get there can make a huge difference," Timothy Chan, director of the Center for Healthcare Engineering at the University of Toronto, told Reuters.

Researchers reached similar conclusions after analyzing cardiac arrest data in Sweden, focusing on towns near Stockholm that don't have enough emergency medical resources to serve summer vacationers. The analysis found an emergency response time of almost 30 minutes and a survival rate of zero under current conditions, said Andreas Claesson, a researcher at the Center for Resuscitation Science at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm and lead author of a study published in JAMA. The simulation showed drones arrived within five minutes of launch. "

To continue reading, please click on the link below! 

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20170623/NEWS/170629966/drones-could-speed-up-defibrillator-delivery

Wheelchair Wedding!

"Out on the edge of the Pacific, on a patio stretching below the swank Ritz-Carlton hotel, the groom smiled nervously. His bride looked radiant, hair encircled with flowers, wedding dress trailing behind as she stepped slowly down the aisle, father at her side.

In most ways, the Saturday fete was like any other wedding. Except one.

The bride is paralyzed from the chest down. But she was able to stride delicately across the bricks because of the ingenuity of the man she was marrying.

This is no ordinary couple, no facsimile of the pair atop the wedding cake.

Janni Smith has not had the use of her legs since 1980, when she was gunned down by a paid assassin seven months after she walked out on her ex-boyfriend. Jerrold Petrofsky is the Irvine-based medical researcher she sought out for help, the man conducting pioneering tests to allow the disabled to walk again."

For more information, please click on the link below! 

http://articles.latimes.com/1991-12-01/local/me-1005_1_research-project

Cleaning Processes May Vary

"A recent outbreak in California of drug-resistant bacteria tied to contaminated endoscopy instruments is helping to bring to light similar outbreaks in other states, according to a report in Bloomberg Business. The bacteria involved are called called Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE).

For instance, six years ago, 15 patients died and another 70 were sickened in Florida in an outbreak similar to the one that occurred at the UCLA Medical Center in recent months. Other “superbug” cases occurred in Pennsylvania, Illinois, and Wisconsin in the past few years—each of which was tied to exposure to a certain type of endoscope and which was not made public, according Bloomberg.

“States have a haphazard approach to tracking the infections,” the news organization reported. “Only about half of the 44 state health departments that responded to questions from Bloomberg said they require hospitals and labs to report individual cases of CRE.”"

For more information, please click the link below!

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/42326/title/Tough-to-Clean-Equipment-a-Bigger-Problem/

Durable Equipment?

"A health policy specialist recently spoke to a community audience about the difficult ethical problems facing family members when serious illness strikes a close relative. After the talk a woman in the audience approached the speaker and said, "That was very interesting. May I ask a question?" "Of course," the speaker replied, "What is it?" The woman said, "Where can I get extra large adult diapers for my mother?"

This incident illustrates two points. First, the basic needs of elderly or ill people must be addressed before they or their family members can think about more abstract or long-term issues. Second, it is very difficult to obtain information about meeting these basic needs, especially when it comes to finding the right products or supplies. The policies and practices of third-party payers - whether private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid - are often confusing and inconsistent. Nevertheless, with a little persistence and some basic information, you can become a more knowledgeable and satisfied consumer. The reward will be an improved quality of life for both the elderly person and the caregiver.

There are two main types of products: durable medical equipment and disposable medical supplies. Both types are used at home to make it easier to manage the basic needs and medical care of elderly, ill or disabled persons. However, both broad categories cover a wide range of products in terms of cost, availability, and effectiveness."

For more information, please click on the link listed below!

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/guide-to-durable-medical-equipment-and-medical-supplies-104574.htm